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Junkers Ju 290 A-7 110186 by kanyiko Junkers Ju 290 A-7 110186 by kanyiko
Junkers Ju 290 A-7 110186 of 1./FAGr.5 (Luftwaffe), based out of Flensburg, Germany, in April 1945.

110186 was the first production Ju 290 A-7, one of a series of 28 aircraft of which 19 were built, but 6 were destroyed by allied bombing before delivery.  '0186' was lucky, being delivered to the Luftwaffe as 'KR+LQ' before being renumbered as '9V+FH' with 1.FAGr.5.  She later became A3+OB at KG 200, and was surrendered to the Royal Air Force at Flensburg airfield on May 5th 1945.  Renumbered "Air Ministry 6" or "AM6" for evaluation purposes, she was test-flown by the Royal Air Force during the summer of 1945 before being stored at RAF Brize Norton.  She was eventually struck off and scrapped on August 14th 1947.

The pilot figure next to the cockpit gives a fair idea of the size of this aircraft...

1/72 Revell 04285
Inventory number 1098 - purchased June 25th 2016
Ninth model completed in 2016
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:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well done! I've always liked these aircraft
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for the kind compliment!! :hug:
Reply
:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I love scale modelling! I used to do way more of it but was too much of a perfectionist about painting!
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Heh, so am I - which might explain my horrible building backlog... T_T
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:iconeyepilot13:
eyepilot13 Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You should see mine! About 50!
Reply
:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My current backlog is about 560... >.>
Reply
:iconalan-the-leopard:
Alan-the-leopard Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2016
AWESOME! But I see one little problem in the design of the aircraft: just imagine that the two gunners to the top get angry at each other and firing to each other dorsal turret... XP
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, actually, the cannons (yes, 20-mm cannons, not guns!) could not be depressed enough, so both turrets (and the navigator's turret between them) were safe from inadvertent, erm... 'gunnery issues'. >.>
Reply
:iconnavjag:
NavJAG Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Most awesome - really like to see these unique WWII aircraft.  Your work on aircraft this is really fantastic - the paint work/camo looks great, and the canopy/glasswork looks amazing!  #1 
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you!! :hug:
Reply
:iconbrit31:
Brit31 Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
Another beauty Kanyiko! What a pity she didn't end up in the RAF Museum. Or any museum.
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The RAF was really bad at preserving historic aircraft at the time - as in fact were most air forces, not yet realising the historic significance of certain types of aircraft.  The RAFM let slip the last intact Dornier Do 217 (scrapped 1956), the last intact Handley-Page Hampden (scrapped 1956), and the last intact Handley-Page Halifax (scrapped 1960) - not to mention what they did to their own Blackburn Beverley!

Then again, the Brussels Army Museum let slip their chance at a Hawker Typhoon (instructional airframe at the Belgian Air Force Technical School - offered but refused in 1952 and subsequently scrapped...)
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:iconbrit31:
Brit31 Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
It just make you weep doesn't it ?! Waaaah! 
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, it does.

But then again, the RAF wasn't exactly the only one committing carnage among classic aircraft at the time.  633 Squadron, for instance, saw a Mosquito blown up in a 'crash landing' - an actual Mosquito, not a movie prop.  Tora, Tora, Tora saw 4 actual PBY Catalina's blown up for the Hickam Field scenes.

And even more recently, a film set during the Berlin Airlift (made in 2005) saw a Douglas Dakota burnt for a crash scene... :(
Reply
:iconbrit31:
Brit31 Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
Whaaat? You're kidding me!! I remember the scenes in 633 Squadron and Tora Tora Tora but I just thought they were mock-ups. OMG Jawdrop 
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
No, unfortunately it is true.

The Mosquitoes sacrificed in 633 Squadron were Mosquito TT.35 RS718, TA642 & TA724 - three Mosquito's, not one. D:

The four Catalina's destroyed in Tora! Tora! Tora! were all wrecks, which had been salvaged from one of the Pacific Islands.  Luckily, the P-40s being shot up were all fiberglass replica's, although the B-17 making one-wheel up landing was an actual crash which had taken place during filming (albeit with little damage to the airframe).

More scandalous was the story behind "The War Lover" of 1961 - that featured three B-17s for the flight scenes, which had been flown from the US to the UK to film the aerial scenes.  However, when filming was wrapped up, the film company, reluctant to pay import duties on these aircraft, had two of them scrapped...

The makers of Battle of Britain actually expected to expend their full fleet of aircraft during the making of the filming - luckily the 'losses' were limited to a Buchon, lost during a ferry flight, and a Spitfire which suffered a nose stand.  While most of the Spitfires, Hurricanes and Buchons used in the film survive, unfortunately most of the (Spanish-built) Heinkels used in the film have since been lost...

The Dakota burnt for "Die Luftbrücke" of 2005 was Douglas Dakota Mk.IV "G-AMPP", a former Scottish Airlines/Dan-Air aircraft which had been affectionately known as "GAMPP the Tramp" for its registration.
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:iconbrit31:
Brit31 Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
That's awful - just pure vandalism in my book. Thanks for the info though.
Reply
:iconbenitezdk:
benitezdk Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
.... Impressive! ... And equipped with RADAR system! ... But to late to turn the tide! .... :wow:
Reply
:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes indeed - albeit not the kind of radar you would expect.

The Ju 290 A-7 variant was fitted with the FuG 200 Hohentwiel maritime radar system, which could track maritime vessels up to a range of 150 km.  This allowed them to home in on their target, after which they could attack them using their Hs 293s.

Unfortunately for the Germans, by this time the Henschel Hs 293 glide bomb was increasingly subject to electronic jamming, rendering it ineffective as a naval weapon - the capture of an intact Hs 293 at Anzio as well as the Kehl guidance transmitter in the wreck of a He 177 in Corsica allowed the Allies to develop an efficient electronic jamming device specifically to counter the Hs 293 A: the AIL Type MAS.  This operated on the same frequency as the bomber's Kehl transmittor, drowning out its signal, and ordering the Hs 293 into a quick series of right-hand turns, effectively making it spiral into the ground/sea.

The Germans were aware of their Hs 293s being jammed as early as April 1944, and started developing alternative variants (the MCLOS Hs 293 B and television-guided Hs 293 D variants), but neither entered serial production before the end of the War...
Reply
:iconbenitezdk:
benitezdk Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
.... Unbelievable ingenuity! .... From both side! .... Thank you for the background story! .... :thumbsup:
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My pleasure!! :hug:
Reply
:icondonaldbrent:
DonaldBrent Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Really nice! I love the figure for scale there. Great to hear her history :love:
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you! :hug:
Reply
:icondonaldbrent:
DonaldBrent Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Welcome! :D
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:icondottys-friend:
dottys-friend Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
And thanks for all the info :)
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My pleasure! ^_^
Reply
:iconzero-cannard:
Zero-Cannard Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow... I want it !! *O*

Good model  :)
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you!! ^_^
Reply
:iconrlkitterman:
rlkitterman Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Photographer
That's an impressive plane!  It looks like an overstuffed Avro Lancaster or B-24.
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well - unlike the Lancaster or Liberator, the Ju 290 was initially intended as a transport aircraft - it even had a loading ramp which extended from its belly, allowing vehicles to drive up into its fuselage (or which could be deployed in flight, allowing it to drop parachutists).  It is only because of its endurance that the Ju 290 was tasked with filling the role of long-range maritime reconnaissance aircraft (and in the later Ju 390 variant, the role of long-range/trans-Atlantic bomber).
Reply
:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016
Beautiful model.  She looks to be under-engined.
Reply
:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
She actually was far more powerful than it seems.  After the end of the War, one captured Ju 290A-4 was flown across the Atlantic for evaluation - she undercut the travel time of the USAAF's fastest C-54 Atlantic crossing by an hour, despite having to land in the Azores for a refuelling stop!
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:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016
Well, the C-54 wasn't a rocket.  I'd be curious how she'd have done against a B-29!
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The B-29 would have been at an advantage - she was pressurised, while the Ju 290 was not!
Reply
:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Professional Writer
:D :D  :heart: :heart:  Fabulous work...

The Nazi's too little, too late attempt to build a heavy bomber...
Reply
:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It was actually the long way around to building a bomber via building a transport derived from a bomber.

The story begins with the Junkers Ju 89, one of two designs for a strategic long-range bomber under General Walther Wever (1887 - 1936).  Wever was a proponent of long-range strategic bombers, contrary to the wishes of most around him in the Luftwaffe.  However, in 1936, General Walther Wever was killed when the Heinkel He 70 liaison aircraft he was flying in crashed after take-off due to a maintenance oversight (the aircraft took off with gust locks in place, leaving it without effective control surfaces).  Following his death, his successor, Ernst Udet, took the Luftwaffe in a different direction - the long-range strategic bombers were abandoned in favour of close-support tactical bombers such as the Ju 87 and Ju 88.  The lack of long-range bombers would seriously hamper the Luftwaffe later on in the Second World War, most notably in the Battle of Britain.

But anyway, the Ju 89 heavy bomber was abandoned, but not before its potential was realised by Deutsche Lufthansa - who asked Junkers to develop a long-range passenger aircraft out of it.  This became the Ju 90, the prototype of which was built from the incomplete third prototype Ju 89.

In all, 18 Ju 90s were built, but only seven of those did service with Deutsche Lufthansa.  A variant for intended use by South African Airways was in the end never built (SAA already used Ju 52/3m's and Ju 86 Z's); and some of the Ju 90s were used to build the subsequent Ju 290 and 390.

Both the military Ju 90 and Ju 290 were initially intended as transport aircraft, but due to their payload and range, they were initially used as long-range maritime reconnaissance aircraft, and eventually as maritime patrol bombers, intended to replace the Fw 200...
Reply
:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Professional Writer
:D :D  :heart:  A man that truly knows history. Impressive summary. Thanks...
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:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My pleasure! :hug:
Reply
:icongymnosophist:
gymnosophist Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Professional Writer
:D  :iconbestbuddiesplz:
Reply
:iconburstlion:
burstlion Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oooh nice work!  That model is lovely, and damn that was a big plane!
Reply
:iconkanyiko:
kanyiko Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!! :hug:
Reply
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Details

Submitted on
September 5, 2016
Image Size
2.8 MB
Resolution
4000×3000
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304
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Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon PowerShot G15
Shutter Speed
1/30 second
Aperture
F/2.5
Focal Length
18 mm
ISO Speed
800
Date Taken
Sep 5, 2016, 9:09:20 PM
Sensor Size
7mm
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